Carried with Love

From the womb to their mother's loving arms and into her heart, babies are carried with love. For centuries mothers over have found clever ways to bring their bundles of joy while going about their day-to-day tasks. Take a look at some examples of babywearing that we've spotted around the world.

By Shefali Agarwal

From the womb to their mother's loving arms and into her heart, babies are carried with love. For centuries mothers over have found clever ways to bring their bundles of joy while going about their day-to-day tasks. Take a look at some examples of babywearing that we've spotted around the world.

In Mexico, babies are sometimes carried in a basket called the ‘huacal,’ which resembles a woven cradle that is suspended from the mother’s head and hangs down her back. Said to have originated during the Aztec Empire, the huacal is still used by some, however traditional woven shawls called ‘rebozos,’ that are wrapped around to make a baby sling, have become more common.

 

Similar to the slings worn in Mexico, Peruvian mothers often wear ‘manta.' This traditional cloth is wrapped around the baby and tied across the mother's shoulders. With their hands free, Andean mothers conduct all manner of day-to-day tasks --  from traversing up the rocky mountain sides to cooking and harvesting potatoes in the fields -- all with their babies snuggly on their backs

 

Although the name and method of tying the fabric vary, slings are common across East Africa as well. Most often the sling, sometimes called a 'kanga,' is tied over one shoulder and under the arm.  This versatile and colorful fabric can also be seen worn as a dress, skirt, or even headpiece.

 

Interestingly enough, in India the concept of using slings or sari cloth for wraps, a method that was popular for many field workers, died with the arrival of strollers and car seats. However it’s been noted that in both the US and India there is a new wave reviving the babywearing practice.

In the U.S., strollers and car seats are used, but babywearing is making a resurgence.

In India the use slings or sari were traditionally used by field workers.

In both the US and India there is a new wave reviving the babywearing practice.

I think we can all agree that there are many ways to carry your precious one, and the commonalities around the world show that babywearing isn’t exclusive to just one culture! So with that, continue carrying on!  


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